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More than half of Americans believe TikTok data ends up with the Chinese government yet say it should not be banned by a small margin

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More than half of Americans believe that data collected by the popular social media app TikTok ends up with the Chinese government, according to the latest J.L. Partners/DailyMail.com 2024 poll.

Yet the huge enthusiasm for the site among young users means the public is split over whether to ban the app.

The results indicate that Americans are becoming more wary of the Chinese-owned app as lawmakers consider legislation that could lead to the company being banned from phones in the U.S.

In a survey of 1,000 likely voters online, 52 percent said they think officials in the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) can get access to the social media’s data, including that of TikTok’s 170 million American users. 

Even when accounting for the margin of error of 3.1 points, Americans still largely think the data can be accessed in China.

TikTok fans arrived on Capitol Hill earlier this month to protest a bill that could ban the app in the U.S. should China-based parent company ByteDance not divest from the company

TikTok fans arrived on Capitol Hill earlier this month to protest a bill that could ban the app in the U.S. should China-based parent company ByteDance not divest from the company

On the other hand, 18 percent of Americans do not think the Chinese government can access TikTok’s data while 30 percent responded ‘Don’t know.’ 

Age is a major factor among those who believe that TikTok data end up with the Chinese government.

The CCP cannot access TikTok’s data 44 percent of those aged 18 – 29 responded. This was the cohort most likely to think that. 

While a majority of those aged 65 and up believe the opposite, with 65 percent saying the CCP can access the data. Just four percent of those in that age group said the data was not accessible to the Chinese government.

But Americans don’t necessarily believe the app should be banned.

By a slim margin, 39 percent of likely voters believe the app should not be banned  while 36 percent of voters think it should be. 

However, 24 percent answered they don’t know.

Again, age appears to be the main divider between those who believe the app should and should not be banned. 

A whopping 64 percent of likely voters aged 18 – 29 said the app should not be banned. 

While 47 percent of those who are aged 65 and older believe TikTok should be banned. 

Earlier this month, TikTok send notifications to its users urging them to call their lawmakers to advocate against the bill which could result in the app being banned. As a result, Congressional offices received thousands of calls, with some callers even threatening to harm the members should they vote for the bill

Earlier this month, TikTok send notifications to its users urging them to call their lawmakers to advocate against the bill which could result in the app being banned. As a result, Congressional offices received thousands of calls, with some callers even threatening to harm the members should they vote for the bill

In total, the survey also found that Americans have a net negative view of the app. 

Just 27 percent said they have a positive view of the app while 37 percent said they view it negatively.  

‘Americans might not like where they think TikTok data ends up, but they are still using it and don’t want it to be banned,’ James Johnson, cofounder of J.L. Partners told DailyMail.com.

‘Two things are at play here: for all the negative views of social media or technology, we just can’t stop using them for their ease and entertainment value.’

‘Second, though some might have a negative view they might not want it banned, perhaps speaking to a lean towards less government action and regulation on companies – even if their intentions are nefarious.’

And TikTok could very well get banned.  

Earlier this month, the House passed in a bipartisan 352 – 65 vote a bill that would force ByteDance – TikTok’s China-based parent company – to divest from the app within 165 days or face a ban in the U.S. 

The bill breezed through the chamber, easily passing just a week after it was introduced. 

The House China Select Committee, which formed the bill, says CCP officials through ByteDance are using TikTok to spy on its U.S. users’ locations and dictate its algorithm to conduct influence campaigns, making it a national security threat.

Chairman Mike Gallagher, R-Wis.

Top Democrat Raja Krishnamoorthi, D-Calif.

Leaders on the bipartisan China Select Committee have warned that the CCP can access TikTok’s data and have used that information to spy on Americans and journalists

TikTok CEO Shou Chew has said the bill would ban the app, indicating that ByteDance has no intentions to divest from the popular video-sharing platform

TikTok CEO Shou Chew has said the bill would ban the app, indicating that ByteDance has no intentions to divest from the popular video-sharing platform

The legislation is now being mulled over by the Senate, and if they decide to pass the bill, President Joe Biden has said he would sign it into law. 

And the Senate has been busy learning about the threats posed by the app.

Earlier this month officials from the FBI, Office of the Director of National Intelligence and Justice Department organized the meeting with senators to brief them on the security implications posed by the Chinese-owned company. 

‘My reaction to this briefing is that TikTok is a gun aimed at American’s heads,’ Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., told DailyMail.com after exiting the meeting. 

‘The urgency of this clear and present danger ought to motivate action right away.’

The upper chamber also held a hearing with TikTok CEO Shou Chew in January, where lawmakers grilled the executive over the security concerns regarding the platform and how it has been used as a tool for child exploitation

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., meanwhile, has not indicated if or when the House-passed bill will get a vote on the floor.

‘The Senate will review the legislation when it comes over from the House,’ is all he has said on the matter.



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