Home Uncategorized Cadbury shop faces a backlash from Christians who accused it of ‘erasing’...

Cadbury shop faces a backlash from Christians who accused it of ‘erasing’ Easter to sell ‘gesture eggs’ instead

34
0


A Cadbury shop has sparked a backlash from Christians who have accused it of ‘erasing’ Easter by selling ‘gesture eggs’.

The chocolate giant – which insists it has used ‘Easter‘ in its marketing for more than 100 years – had a two-for-£10 promotion on ‘gesture eggs’ at an independently run discount store in Springfields Outlet in Spalding, Lincolnshire.

The decision to remove the word ‘Easter’ has sparked anger among Christians who argue that ‘without the message of Easter there would be no reason for Easter eggs’.

Andrea Williams, the CEO of Christian Concern, told MailOnline: ‘The original Cadbury family who founded the business were deeply motivated by their Christian faith and used profits from their business to serve charitable causes across the world.

‘It’s a shame for them to have forgotten those deep Christian roots.’ 

Cadbury said the ‘gesture eggs’ promotion was independently run by Freshstore  which operates the discount store and denied having any involvement in it. 

A Cadbury shop has sparked a backlash from Christians who have accused it of 'erasing' Easter by selling 'gesture eggs'. Pictured: The Springfields Outlet in Spalding, Lincolnshire, selling 'gesture eggs'

A Cadbury shop has sparked a backlash from Christians who have accused it of ‘erasing’ Easter by selling ‘gesture eggs’. Pictured: The Springfields Outlet in Spalding, Lincolnshire, selling ‘gesture eggs’

This picture shows the promotional poster for 'gesture eggs' at the Springfields Outlet Cadbury shop

This picture shows the promotional poster for ‘gesture eggs’ at the Springfields Outlet Cadbury shop 

This East Midlands Designer Outlet was also advertising 'gesture eggs' at two for £10

This East Midlands Designer Outlet was also advertising ‘gesture eggs’ at two for £10 

Other Cadbury outlet stores in Cheshire Oaks, Wirral, and Alfreton, Derbyshire, have also promoted ‘gesture eggs’.

Tim Dieppe, the head of public policy at Christian Concern, told MailOnline: ‘Easter eggs symbolise the resurrection – just as Jesus rose again from the tomb, new life emerges from eggshells. 

‘They also symbolise the new life that we can have through the forgiveness that Jesus obtained for us on the cross, enabling us to be ‘born again’. Without the message of Easter there would be no reason for Easter eggs. 

‘One wonders why Cadburys would want to erase the connection between Easter and eggs? If people stop celebrating Easter, they might well stop buying Easter eggs.’

It’s understood the eggs pictured were named as ‘Special Gesture’ eggs by the  independent retailer and that ‘Easter’ is routinely used in other areas of Cadbury’s advertising. 

Outraged shoppers also criticised the promotion, with one simply writing: ‘The world’s gone.’ 

Another tweeted: ‘I’m not even religious and this gets my back right up, why are all things Christian being attacked right now.’

A third said: ‘They can keep their eggs.’ 

A fourth posted: ‘What an utter disgrace, i am so so sick of this woke pandering society we live in.’ 

And a fifth wrote: ‘I love Cadbury’s chocolate but won’t be buying any Easter eggs called gesture eggs.’ 

This is not the first time Cabdury has come under fire for the omission of the word ‘Easter’. The National Trust Easter egg trail, which used to be sponsored by Cadbury, was renamed the ‘Great British Egg Hunt’ in 2017.

The Church of England accused the National Trust and Cadbury of ‘airbrushing faith’, while the then Prime Minister Theresa May described the move as ‘absolutely ridiculous’.

It comes in the wake of other institutions coming under fire for Christian-related incidents.

In January, the Met Police faced a backlash after a volunteer police officer told a Christian singer that she was ‘not allowed’ to perform ‘church songs outside of church grounds’.

In January, the Met Police faced a backlash after a volunteer police officer told a Christian singer that she was 'not allowed' to perform 'church songs outside of church grounds'

In January, the Met Police faced a backlash after a volunteer police officer told a Christian singer that she was ‘not allowed’ to perform ‘church songs outside of church grounds’ 

Meanwhile last August, Porsche came under fire over claims it had airbrushed out the famous Cristo Rei (Christ the King) landmark in Lisbon in a video celebrating 60 years of the iconic 911 sports car. 

The famous landmark – which was inspired by the Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro, in Brazil – was edited out, with Porsche opting instead to just show the 75ft concrete plinth. 

Porsche later apologised for ‘any offence caused’ and called it a ‘mistake’, and reuploaded a version of the video to YouTube that includes the full statue.

Also last year, the London School of Economics was accused of being ‘ashamed’ of Britain’s history and culture after dropping its Christian term names.

The institution, which is popular with overseas students, says it changed the names to ‘better reflect the international nature of our community’.

In a Porsche video last summer, the statue of Jesus Christ with his arms spread wide was edited out

In a Porsche video last summer, the statue of Jesus Christ with his arms spread wide was edited out

The statue of Jesus can be seen in the background of this picture of the 25 de Abril bridge in Lisbon

It changed Michaelmas to ‘autumn term’, Christmas break to ‘winter break’ and Lent Term to ‘winter term’ and, in an echo of universities in the United States, Easter break to ‘spring break’.

Toby Young, the general secretary of the Free Speech Union, told MailOnline at the time that the move was ‘another example’ of a British university being ‘ashamed of its links to the culture and history of Great Britain’.

Swansea University also renamed its Michaelmas and Lent terms in favour of secular alternatives.

It also emerged last year that the University of Kent had been discouraging use of the phrase ‘Christian name’, claiming it is offensive to non-Christians.

The University of Kent told students to stop using the term because it claims it only relates to Christians, instead suggesting students say ‘first name’ or ‘given name’.

The university also took against using the word ‘surname’ because it derives from ‘sire-name’ and is therefore deemed to be patriarchal.

The University of Brighton has also advised staff not to say ‘Christmas’ and instead call it the ‘winter closure period’.

A spokesperson for Mondelez International, which owns Cadbury, said: ‘All Cadbury Easter shell eggs sold in the UK reference Easter very clearly on the packaging – sometimes multiple times. Cadbury has used the word Easter in our marketing and communications for over 100 years and continue to do so with our new Easter product range. To claim anything otherwise is factually incorrect.

‘We are proud of the role we play within families’ Easter celebrations and have a wide range of products that can be enjoyed throughout the Easter season.’



Source link

Previous articleNickelodeon Star Allie DiMeco Says She Was Forced To Kiss Much Older Man On ‘Naked Brothers Band’ & Felt “I Might Be Fired If I Didn’t Do It”
Next articleDisney’s ‘Zombies 4’ Rounds Out Cast As Production Begins In New Zealand

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here